Vote.org: Paintings, Politics, and Progress
Sep 10 2020

Vote.org: Paintings, Politics, and Progress

By: Lawrence Bourgeois

Vote.org has been a prominent advocate of its eponymous part of American government for over 10 years, and they are launching a new initiative to stem the rising tide of voter apathy. This plan involves partnering with various cultural institutions, such as art galleries, to provide imagery and symbolism that can speak to a diverse audience about how critical voting is for a healthy democracy.

The fabled November 2020 general election is approaching us with a frightening quickness (or at a snail's pace, depending on how you have spent your quarantine). For as long as there has been democratic voting in America, there has been a push, in some fashion or another, to expand the pool of those who are allowed to participate. Not only that, but it is essential for a democracy that all inhabitants are represented.

In an effort to push these notions forward, Vote.org is partnering up with various art institutions and allies to the cause across the nation to promote an initiative that pushes for more voter activity. A few of these institutions include The Brooklyn Museum, The Jewish Museum, ICA Los Angeles, ICA Boston, and many more. This project, aptly christened "Plan Your Vote," is a collaboration between enthusiastic art creators and curators alike in an effort to nudge the American population to speak their mind with the ballot. Voter apathy is a problem with no easy solution, and with the current state of the health crisis in our nation, it is feared that turnout may be even lower, as some people fear to venture outside of their homes unnecessarily. The Plan Your Vote platform aims to ameliorate this issue remotely, by having partnered institutions such as The Guggenheim directly promote voting enthusiasm on their social media platforms. It is undeniably a smart decision, with electronic usage and, similarly, social media usage at all-time highs.

Much of the imagery being provided on said social media is intended to be evocative of the power we have, together, as voters in a democracy, to promote bi-partisan involvement. Remember, voting is your right, and it is one that should be exercised liberally. The naysayers might be right when they say an individual vote almost never matters—not on its own. But all those individual votes together make up a group vote and make a difference. So let your voices be heard.

Please visit Vote.org for access to quick registration and essential information.



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