Where Y'At Staff/Provided Photo

Great Sandwiches for New Orleans' Mardi Gras

21:00 January 26, 2015
By: Kim Ranjbar

Whether it be a sloppy, 10-napkin-needing roast beef or an overstuffed, fully dressed fried shrimp, New Orleans has a well-deserved reputation for offering outstanding po-boys. Practically synonymous with the Crescent City, po-boys were born here and there's nowhere in the world that can make French bread (mandatory for the perfect po-boy) quite like we do. That being said, there are often times we need to speak a little louder over the echoing cries about the perennial po-boy and give a shout out to restaurants who are serving stellar sandwiches that deserve equal attention and admiration from both our hearts and our stomachs.

Shout Out For Sandwiches
[Where Y'At Staff/Provided Photo]

Over on Freret Street, one of the city's fastest-growing corridors, you'll find a casual counter-service restaurant dubbed Wayfare, one devoted to perfecting the art of the sandwich. Open for almost two years now and run by brothers Ray and Vincent Arnona, Wayfare is almost a complete turnaround from the Freret Street Boxing Gym, the building's previous inhabitants. Almost, but not quite, because Wayfare is still serving up a Knuckle Sandwich, one that will definitely knock your socks off…in a good way. The Knuckle is loaded with juicy, chilled roast beef tossed with a horseradish aioli and topped with pickled red onions, shoestring potato crisps and peppery arugula on a thick pretzel bun for 12 bucks! Plus, for only a buck extra, none of Wayfare's sandwiches would be complete without their house-made potato chips.

Shout Out For Sandwiches
[Where Y'At Staff/Provided Photo]

Cochon Butcher in the Warehouse District is indubitably a popular location for a stellar sandwich. Run in and pick up their house-cured and roasted meats to make one at home, or stay a while for one of the most incredible BLTs you've ever had the pleasure to put your mouth on. Using their own house-cured and smoked bacon, Butcher makes the ordinary extraordinary with locally grown tomatoes, arugula, house-made mayonnaise and shaved red onions on toasted white sourdough bread fresh from Chef Susan Spicer's own Wildflour Breads. Once you've had a BLT at Cochon Butcher, you'll wonder how future BLTs will ever measure up.

Speaking of pork, the newly opened NOLA Smokehouseowned by BBQ master Rob Bechtold offers a sandwich to end all sandwiches amid its mouth-watering brisket, burnt ends and ribs. Head to the corner of Jackson and Annunciation for the Aporkalypse, which features house-smoked pulled pork with Barq's Root Beer and bacon jam, sinful pork pate and crispy cracklins. At only $8, this sandwich works well within your budget…so well, you should probably add a side of sweet corn spoonbread for only $3 more. It may not be the last pulled pork sandwich you'll ever eat, but it will certainly be one of the best.

Shout Out For Sandwiches
[Where Y'At Staff/Provided Photo]

The bread on which a great sandwich is built is obviously an important factor when calculating overall deliciousness. For example, it's pretty hard to beat a sandwich made in a bakery like Tartine. Located in a tiny house-turned-bakery on Perrier Street, Tartine is a small taste of Paris hidden in the wilds of New Orleans. Run by Baker/Chef Cara Benson and her husband, Evan, this casual eatery offers salads, soups and "tartines," or open-faced sandwiches on bread that was baked that very morning. Though you've probably heard raves for it before, here it is again: Tartine's Pork Rillette with shaved onion, marmalade and tangy cornichons (small, sour pickles) on Benson's handmade, toasted baguette.

Shout Out For Sandwiches
[Where Y'At Staff/Provided Photo]

Along with cool, creamy milkshakes, The Milk Bar also features a few pretty incredible sandwiches, all of which are served on their own house-made ciabatta bread. You can go to the original on Delachaise Street uptown or to their second location on South Carrollton Avenue in the Riverbend, but either way you'll have a tough time choosing between a dozen lip-smacking sandwiches, all priced under ten bucks a piece. Will you have the Speared Pig with smoked ham, asparagus and Hollandaise sauce; a Wolf Me Down with roast lamb and hummus or, one of my favorites, The Blue Heeler with roast beef, gravy, sauteed mushrooms and blue cheese? It certainly is tough being a New Orleanian sometimes.

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