Courtesy Paramount Pictures

Movie Review: The Lost City

15:00 March 29, 2022
By: David Vicari

Actress Sandra Bullock has been on several late night talk shows promoting her new movie, The Lost City, and, as a talk show guest, she was as vibrant and funny as ever. So, it's disconcerting that the screenplay for The Lost City, which is credited to four writers, really lets her down. The movie just isn't that funny...or exciting.

In The Lost City, Bullock plays Loretta Sage, a reclusive writer of a series of adventure-romance novels featuring a fictional male hero named Dash McMahon. The hunky but brainless male model who poses as Dash for the book covers is Alan Caprison (Channing Tatum), who lets the job go to his head, and thinks he is Dash in real life. This is put to the test when Loretta is kidnapped by a nutty billionaire, Abigail Fairfax (Daniel Radcliffe), who thinks she knows the location of a priceless treasure because of the historic research she had done for her books with the help from her late husband, who was an archaeologist. Alan hires ex-Navy SEAL Jack Trainer (Brad Pitt) to help rescue Loretta, but things don't work out and Alan has to complete the mission on his own.

There is a subplot about Loretta's publisher (Da'Vine Joy Randolph) attempting to locate her client, but this goes nowhere. It just feels like filler.

Pitt is amusing in his role, which is pretty much an extended cameo, so there is a major drop in energy when he leaves the picture. What we are left with is a lot of bickering between the two leads, and we rarely get a punchline that pays off. The lazy writing also includes a scene where Loretta has to pull leeches off of Alan's derriere. That's the level of jokes here.

The film's original full title was The Lost City of D, but was shortened to the more generic The Lost City. That is fitting, because this film is woefully generic.

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