<em>Serial</em> Podcast Sets Date for New Season Focused on Real-Life Alabama Murder
Feb 01 2017

Serial Podcast Sets Date for New Season Focused on Real-Life Alabama Murder

By: Samantha Yrle

After two seasons of the thrilling documentary podcast, “Serial”, the creators have finally released information on the third season which will air in March of 2017. With over 250 million downloads, the documentary is the first podcast to win a Peabody award. The nail-biting series is comprised of a week by week narration of controversial crime cases that attempts to clear up any details that may have been overlooked in hopes of disclosing the truth.  

The podcast became an instant hit with the launch of its first season, in which Sarah Koenig recounts the events of the murder of Baltimore teen, Hae Min Lee in 2000. Lee’s boyfriend, Adnan Syed was convicted of the murder. With the show’s growing popularity came questions of Syed’s guilt, and last summer the judge granted Syed a retrial. The second season recounted the story of US Army soldier Bowe Bergdahl who was captured by the Taliban. 

Now, in association with public radio’s “This American Life,” the creators of “Serial” have formed a new production under the name Serial Productions. This March, Serial Productions brings to audiences “S-Town”, the first podcast of the new production and third season of “Serial.”

“This American Life” producer, Brian Reed began production of “S-Town” when a man asked Reed to investigate the mysterious case of a murder in a rural Alabama town by the son of a wealthy family who had supposedly been boasting about getting away with murder.  Reed agreed to the task, but shortly after, a second story appeared when another person was murdered in the Alabama town.

Tune in to “S-Town” this March to hear the grueling details of a double murder and an edge-of-your-seat story about a bitter feud, a search for hidden treasure, and the mysteries of one man’s life. 

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